Homesickness: Tips and Tricks to Help You Cope & Feel Better

Homesickness: Tips and Tricks to Help You Cope & Feel Better

Shreya Sharma

February 13, 2020

Fact Checked by: Shreya Sharma

5 mins read

Homesickness

Is a feeling of longing or yearning for one’s home or familiar surroundings, often accompanied by feelings of sadness or nostalgia. It can occur when a person is away from home for an extended period of time, such as when traveling or living away from family and friends. Homesickness can also occur when a person experiences a significant change or loss in their home life, such as moving to a new city or losing a loved one. 

Causes

  1. Separation from loved ones: Homesickness often occurs when a person is separated from loved ones, such as family members or close friends. 
  1. Change of environment: A change in environment, such as moving to a new city or country, can also trigger homesickness. 
  1. Lack of familiar surroundings: Being in a new place without familiar surroundings can make a person feel disoriented and homesick. 
  1. Adjustment issues: Homesickness can also occur when a person is having difficulty adjusting to a new situation, such as starting a new job or school. 
  1. Trauma or past experiences: Traumatic events or past experiences can also contribute to homesickness, as they may trigger feelings of loss or longing. 
  1. Mental health issues: Homesickness can also be a symptom of underlying mental health issues such as anxiety or depression. 
  1. Long-term travel: Long-term travelers may experience homesickness as they miss their homes, familiar places, and people. 
  1. Social isolation: Social isolation or feeling lonely can also contribute to homesickness. 
  1. Homesickness can also be caused by a lack of control over one’s life, leaving the person feeling powerless and longing for the familiar. 
  1. Homesickness can also be caused by a lack of personal growth and self-fulfillment, making the person want to return to a place where they felt more contented. 

Symptoms of Homesickness 

Symptoms of homesickness can include: 

  1. Anxiety or sadness when thinking about home or loved ones. 
  1. Difficulty adjusting to new surroundings or environments. 
  1. Physical symptoms such as headaches, stomach aches, or fatigue. 
  1. Difficulty sleeping or insomnia. 
  1. Loss of appetite or overeating. 
  1. Difficulty focusing or feeling unmotivated. 
  1. Social isolation or feelings of loneliness. 
  1. Constant longing for familiar places, routines, or people. 
  1. Constant comparison of the current situation with one’s home. 
  1. Difficulty accepting new friends or experiences. 

It is important to note that these symptoms can vary from person to person and can also depend on the context and duration of being away from home. 

Treatment of Homesickness

  1. Time: Give yourself time to adjust to your new environment. Homesickness is normal and usually improves over time. 
  1. Stay connected: Stay in touch with friends and family back home through phone calls, emails, and social media. 
  1. Get involved: Join clubs, groups or organizations that share your interests. This will help you make new friends and feel more connected to your new community. 
  1. Take care of yourself: Eat well, exercise, and get enough sleep. These simple things can help improve your mood and reduce feelings of homesickness. 
  1. Seek help: If your homesickness persists or becomes overwhelming, seek help from a therapist or counselor. They can help you cope with the feelings and develop strategies to adjust to your new environment. 
  1. Be open-minded: Be open to new experiences and try to find the positive aspects of your new surroundings. 
  1. Create a sense of home: Bring familiar items from home such as photographs, books, or mementos to help create a sense of familiarity in your new environment. 
  1. Distract yourself: Engage in activities that take your mind off of homesickness such as reading, watching movies, or listening to music. 
  1. Remember that it is normal: Homesickness is a normal feeling and something that most people experience at some point in their lives. 

7 ways of cope with homesickness 

  1. Stay connected with loved ones: Keeping in touch with family and friends can help alleviate feelings of homesickness by providing a sense of familiarity and connection to home. 
  1. Create a sense of home: Surround yourself with familiar items, such as photos or artwork, to create a sense of comfort and familiarity in your new surroundings. 
  1. Find ways to stay active: Engaging in physical activities, such as sports or fitness classes, can help take your mind off of feeling homesick and provide a sense of accomplishment. 
  1. Explore your new surroundings: Taking the time to explore your new community or city can help you feel more connected to your new home and create new memories. 
  1. Seek out support: Joining clubs or groups that share your interests can provide a sense of community and support, helping to alleviate feelings of homesickness. 
  1. Practice self-care: Taking care of yourself through healthy eating, exercise, and relaxation can help improve your mood and reduce feelings of homesickness. 
  1. Seek professional help: If your homesickness persists and is affecting your daily life, consider seeking professional help from a therapist or counselor. They can help you work through your feelings and develop strategies to cope with homesickness. 

In conclusion, homesickness is a common feeling that many people experience, especially when they are away from their families and loved ones for extended periods of time. It can manifest itself in many different ways and can range from mild to severe. However, it is important to remember that homesickness is a normal feeling and that there are ways to cope with it. By keeping in touch with loved ones, staying busy, and finding ways to remind yourself of home, you can manage homesickness and make the most of your time away. Ultimately, it is important to remember that homesickness is a temporary feeling and that time away from home can also be an opportunity for growth and self-discovery.

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